Join the Polasek Museum today and receive your invi­ta­tion to attend these spe­cial events. Call our office at (407) 647‑6294 for more info.

 

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* Holy Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­siaHoly Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­sia

Icons from the 17th C. –Early 20th C. The sacred images on view in this exhi­bi­tion are of a kind once read­ily found in even the hum­blest homes of Rus­sia, as well as its churches and pub­lic shrines. Centuries-old artis­tic con­ven­tions are jux­ta­posed with new, West­ern­ized for­mal ele­ments and ver­nac­u­lar inter­pre­ta­tions of these new forms. For Ortho­dox Rus­sians, icons served as more than just reli­gious paint­ings; they were relic-like objects directly linked to the holy fig­ures they depicted.They were seen as com­forters and pow­er­ful guardians.Icons were the direct line from the real world to the spir­i­tual and appeared every­where in pre-Soviet Russia.On loan from Hollingsworth Fine Art.

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* Holy Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­siaHoly Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­sia

Icons from the 17th C. –Early 20th C. The sacred images on view in this exhi­bi­tion are of a kind once read­ily found in even the hum­blest homes of Rus­sia, as well as its churches and pub­lic shrines. Centuries-old artis­tic con­ven­tions are jux­ta­posed with new, West­ern­ized for­mal ele­ments and ver­nac­u­lar inter­pre­ta­tions of these new forms. For Ortho­dox Rus­sians, icons served as more than just reli­gious paint­ings; they were relic-like objects directly linked to the holy fig­ures they depicted.They were seen as com­forters and pow­er­ful guardians.Icons were the direct line from the real world to the spir­i­tual and appeared every­where in pre-Soviet Russia.On loan from Hollingsworth Fine Art.

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* Holy Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­siaHoly Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­sia

Icons from the 17th C. –Early 20th C. The sacred images on view in this exhi­bi­tion are of a kind once read­ily found in even the hum­blest homes of Rus­sia, as well as its churches and pub­lic shrines. Centuries-old artis­tic con­ven­tions are jux­ta­posed with new, West­ern­ized for­mal ele­ments and ver­nac­u­lar inter­pre­ta­tions of these new forms. For Ortho­dox Rus­sians, icons served as more than just reli­gious paint­ings; they were relic-like objects directly linked to the holy fig­ures they depicted.They were seen as com­forters and pow­er­ful guardians.Icons were the direct line from the real world to the spir­i­tual and appeared every­where in pre-Soviet Russia.On loan from Hollingsworth Fine Art.

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* Holy Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­siaHoly Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­sia

Icons from the 17th C. –Early 20th C. The sacred images on view in this exhi­bi­tion are of a kind once read­ily found in even the hum­blest homes of Rus­sia, as well as its churches and pub­lic shrines. Centuries-old artis­tic con­ven­tions are jux­ta­posed with new, West­ern­ized for­mal ele­ments and ver­nac­u­lar inter­pre­ta­tions of these new forms. For Ortho­dox Rus­sians, icons served as more than just reli­gious paint­ings; they were relic-like objects directly linked to the holy fig­ures they depicted.They were seen as com­forters and pow­er­ful guardians.Icons were the direct line from the real world to the spir­i­tual and appeared every­where in pre-Soviet Russia.On loan from Hollingsworth Fine Art.

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* Holy Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­siaHoly Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­sia

Icons from the 17th C. –Early 20th C. The sacred images on view in this exhi­bi­tion are of a kind once read­ily found in even the hum­blest homes of Rus­sia, as well as its churches and pub­lic shrines. Centuries-old artis­tic con­ven­tions are jux­ta­posed with new, West­ern­ized for­mal ele­ments and ver­nac­u­lar inter­pre­ta­tions of these new forms. For Ortho­dox Rus­sians, icons served as more than just reli­gious paint­ings; they were relic-like objects directly linked to the holy fig­ures they depicted.They were seen as com­forters and pow­er­ful guardians.Icons were the direct line from the real world to the spir­i­tual and appeared every­where in pre-Soviet Russia.On loan from Hollingsworth Fine Art.

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* Holy Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­siaHoly Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­sia

Icons from the 17th C. –Early 20th C. The sacred images on view in this exhi­bi­tion are of a kind once read­ily found in even the hum­blest homes of Rus­sia, as well as its churches and pub­lic shrines. Centuries-old artis­tic con­ven­tions are jux­ta­posed with new, West­ern­ized for­mal ele­ments and ver­nac­u­lar inter­pre­ta­tions of these new forms. For Ortho­dox Rus­sians, icons served as more than just reli­gious paint­ings; they were relic-like objects directly linked to the holy fig­ures they depicted.They were seen as com­forters and pow­er­ful guardians.Icons were the direct line from the real world to the spir­i­tual and appeared every­where in pre-Soviet Russia.On loan from Hollingsworth Fine Art.

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* Holy Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­siaHoly Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­sia

Icons from the 17th C. –Early 20th C. The sacred images on view in this exhi­bi­tion are of a kind once read­ily found in even the hum­blest homes of Rus­sia, as well as its churches and pub­lic shrines. Centuries-old artis­tic con­ven­tions are jux­ta­posed with new, West­ern­ized for­mal ele­ments and ver­nac­u­lar inter­pre­ta­tions of these new forms. For Ortho­dox Rus­sians, icons served as more than just reli­gious paint­ings; they were relic-like objects directly linked to the holy fig­ures they depicted.They were seen as com­forters and pow­er­ful guardians.Icons were the direct line from the real world to the spir­i­tual and appeared every­where in pre-Soviet Russia.On loan from Hollingsworth Fine Art.

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* Holy Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­siaHoly Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­sia

Icons from the 17th C. –Early 20th C. The sacred images on view in this exhi­bi­tion are of a kind once read­ily found in even the hum­blest homes of Rus­sia, as well as its churches and pub­lic shrines. Centuries-old artis­tic con­ven­tions are jux­ta­posed with new, West­ern­ized for­mal ele­ments and ver­nac­u­lar inter­pre­ta­tions of these new forms. For Ortho­dox Rus­sians, icons served as more than just reli­gious paint­ings; they were relic-like objects directly linked to the holy fig­ures they depicted.They were seen as com­forters and pow­er­ful guardians.Icons were the direct line from the real world to the spir­i­tual and appeared every­where in pre-Soviet Russia.On loan from Hollingsworth Fine Art.

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* Holy Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­siaHoly Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­sia

Icons from the 17th C. –Early 20th C. The sacred images on view in this exhi­bi­tion are of a kind once read­ily found in even the hum­blest homes of Rus­sia, as well as its churches and pub­lic shrines. Centuries-old artis­tic con­ven­tions are jux­ta­posed with new, West­ern­ized for­mal ele­ments and ver­nac­u­lar inter­pre­ta­tions of these new forms. For Ortho­dox Rus­sians, icons served as more than just reli­gious paint­ings; they were relic-like objects directly linked to the holy fig­ures they depicted.They were seen as com­forters and pow­er­ful guardians.Icons were the direct line from the real world to the spir­i­tual and appeared every­where in pre-Soviet Russia.On loan from Hollingsworth Fine Art.

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* Holy Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­siaHoly Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­sia

Icons from the 17th C. –Early 20th C. The sacred images on view in this exhi­bi­tion are of a kind once read­ily found in even the hum­blest homes of Rus­sia, as well as its churches and pub­lic shrines. Centuries-old artis­tic con­ven­tions are jux­ta­posed with new, West­ern­ized for­mal ele­ments and ver­nac­u­lar inter­pre­ta­tions of these new forms. For Ortho­dox Rus­sians, icons served as more than just reli­gious paint­ings; they were relic-like objects directly linked to the holy fig­ures they depicted.They were seen as com­forters and pow­er­ful guardians.Icons were the direct line from the real world to the spir­i­tual and appeared every­where in pre-Soviet Russia.On loan from Hollingsworth Fine Art.

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* Holy Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­siaHoly Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­sia

Icons from the 17th C. –Early 20th C. The sacred images on view in this exhi­bi­tion are of a kind once read­ily found in even the hum­blest homes of Rus­sia, as well as its churches and pub­lic shrines. Centuries-old artis­tic con­ven­tions are jux­ta­posed with new, West­ern­ized for­mal ele­ments and ver­nac­u­lar inter­pre­ta­tions of these new forms. For Ortho­dox Rus­sians, icons served as more than just reli­gious paint­ings; they were relic-like objects directly linked to the holy fig­ures they depicted.They were seen as com­forters and pow­er­ful guardians.Icons were the direct line from the real world to the spir­i­tual and appeared every­where in pre-Soviet Russia.On loan from Hollingsworth Fine Art.

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* Holy Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­siaHoly Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­sia

Icons from the 17th C. –Early 20th C. The sacred images on view in this exhi­bi­tion are of a kind once read­ily found in even the hum­blest homes of Rus­sia, as well as its churches and pub­lic shrines. Centuries-old artis­tic con­ven­tions are jux­ta­posed with new, West­ern­ized for­mal ele­ments and ver­nac­u­lar inter­pre­ta­tions of these new forms. For Ortho­dox Rus­sians, icons served as more than just reli­gious paint­ings; they were relic-like objects directly linked to the holy fig­ures they depicted.They were seen as com­forters and pow­er­ful guardians.Icons were the direct line from the real world to the spir­i­tual and appeared every­where in pre-Soviet Russia.On loan from Hollingsworth Fine Art.

* Boat ParadeBoat Parade

Time: 4:31 pm

In con­junc­tion with the Rotary Club of Win­ter Park, the Polasek hosts the 10th annual Win­ter Park Boat Parade viewed from the lush Museum grounds on the shore of Lake Osce­ola. Activ­i­ties start at 5 pm and parade at sundown.

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* Holy Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­siaHoly Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­sia

Icons from the 17th C. –Early 20th C. The sacred images on view in this exhi­bi­tion are of a kind once read­ily found in even the hum­blest homes of Rus­sia, as well as its churches and pub­lic shrines. Centuries-old artis­tic con­ven­tions are jux­ta­posed with new, West­ern­ized for­mal ele­ments and ver­nac­u­lar inter­pre­ta­tions of these new forms. For Ortho­dox Rus­sians, icons served as more than just reli­gious paint­ings; they were relic-like objects directly linked to the holy fig­ures they depicted.They were seen as com­forters and pow­er­ful guardians.Icons were the direct line from the real world to the spir­i­tual and appeared every­where in pre-Soviet Russia.On loan from Hollingsworth Fine Art.

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* Holy Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­siaHoly Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­sia

Icons from the 17th C. –Early 20th C. The sacred images on view in this exhi­bi­tion are of a kind once read­ily found in even the hum­blest homes of Rus­sia, as well as its churches and pub­lic shrines. Centuries-old artis­tic con­ven­tions are jux­ta­posed with new, West­ern­ized for­mal ele­ments and ver­nac­u­lar inter­pre­ta­tions of these new forms. For Ortho­dox Rus­sians, icons served as more than just reli­gious paint­ings; they were relic-like objects directly linked to the holy fig­ures they depicted.They were seen as com­forters and pow­er­ful guardians.Icons were the direct line from the real world to the spir­i­tual and appeared every­where in pre-Soviet Russia.On loan from Hollingsworth Fine Art.

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* Holy Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­siaHoly Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­sia

Icons from the 17th C. –Early 20th C. The sacred images on view in this exhi­bi­tion are of a kind once read­ily found in even the hum­blest homes of Rus­sia, as well as its churches and pub­lic shrines. Centuries-old artis­tic con­ven­tions are jux­ta­posed with new, West­ern­ized for­mal ele­ments and ver­nac­u­lar inter­pre­ta­tions of these new forms. For Ortho­dox Rus­sians, icons served as more than just reli­gious paint­ings; they were relic-like objects directly linked to the holy fig­ures they depicted.They were seen as com­forters and pow­er­ful guardians.Icons were the direct line from the real world to the spir­i­tual and appeared every­where in pre-Soviet Russia.On loan from Hollingsworth Fine Art.

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* Holy Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­siaHoly Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­sia

Icons from the 17th C. –Early 20th C. The sacred images on view in this exhi­bi­tion are of a kind once read­ily found in even the hum­blest homes of Rus­sia, as well as its churches and pub­lic shrines. Centuries-old artis­tic con­ven­tions are jux­ta­posed with new, West­ern­ized for­mal ele­ments and ver­nac­u­lar inter­pre­ta­tions of these new forms. For Ortho­dox Rus­sians, icons served as more than just reli­gious paint­ings; they were relic-like objects directly linked to the holy fig­ures they depicted.They were seen as com­forters and pow­er­ful guardians.Icons were the direct line from the real world to the spir­i­tual and appeared every­where in pre-Soviet Russia.On loan from Hollingsworth Fine Art.

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* Holy Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­siaHoly Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­sia

Icons from the 17th C. –Early 20th C. The sacred images on view in this exhi­bi­tion are of a kind once read­ily found in even the hum­blest homes of Rus­sia, as well as its churches and pub­lic shrines. Centuries-old artis­tic con­ven­tions are jux­ta­posed with new, West­ern­ized for­mal ele­ments and ver­nac­u­lar inter­pre­ta­tions of these new forms. For Ortho­dox Rus­sians, icons served as more than just reli­gious paint­ings; they were relic-like objects directly linked to the holy fig­ures they depicted.They were seen as com­forters and pow­er­ful guardians.Icons were the direct line from the real world to the spir­i­tual and appeared every­where in pre-Soviet Russia.On loan from Hollingsworth Fine Art.

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* Holy Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­siaHoly Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­sia

Icons from the 17th C. –Early 20th C. The sacred images on view in this exhi­bi­tion are of a kind once read­ily found in even the hum­blest homes of Rus­sia, as well as its churches and pub­lic shrines. Centuries-old artis­tic con­ven­tions are jux­ta­posed with new, West­ern­ized for­mal ele­ments and ver­nac­u­lar inter­pre­ta­tions of these new forms. For Ortho­dox Rus­sians, icons served as more than just reli­gious paint­ings; they were relic-like objects directly linked to the holy fig­ures they depicted.They were seen as com­forters and pow­er­ful guardians.Icons were the direct line from the real world to the spir­i­tual and appeared every­where in pre-Soviet Russia.On loan from Hollingsworth Fine Art.

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* Holy Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­siaHoly Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­sia

Icons from the 17th C. –Early 20th C. The sacred images on view in this exhi­bi­tion are of a kind once read­ily found in even the hum­blest homes of Rus­sia, as well as its churches and pub­lic shrines. Centuries-old artis­tic con­ven­tions are jux­ta­posed with new, West­ern­ized for­mal ele­ments and ver­nac­u­lar inter­pre­ta­tions of these new forms. For Ortho­dox Rus­sians, icons served as more than just reli­gious paint­ings; they were relic-like objects directly linked to the holy fig­ures they depicted.They were seen as com­forters and pow­er­ful guardians.Icons were the direct line from the real world to the spir­i­tual and appeared every­where in pre-Soviet Russia.On loan from Hollingsworth Fine Art.

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* Holy Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­siaHoly Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­sia

Icons from the 17th C. –Early 20th C. The sacred images on view in this exhi­bi­tion are of a kind once read­ily found in even the hum­blest homes of Rus­sia, as well as its churches and pub­lic shrines. Centuries-old artis­tic con­ven­tions are jux­ta­posed with new, West­ern­ized for­mal ele­ments and ver­nac­u­lar inter­pre­ta­tions of these new forms. For Ortho­dox Rus­sians, icons served as more than just reli­gious paint­ings; they were relic-like objects directly linked to the holy fig­ures they depicted.They were seen as com­forters and pow­er­ful guardians.Icons were the direct line from the real world to the spir­i­tual and appeared every­where in pre-Soviet Russia.On loan from Hollingsworth Fine Art.

* Christ­mas Eve ClosedChrist­mas Eve Closed

Time: 2:15 pm


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* Closed: Christ­mas DayClosed: Christ­mas Day


* Holy Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­siaHoly Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­sia

Icons from the 17th C. –Early 20th C. The sacred images on view in this exhi­bi­tion are of a kind once read­ily found in even the hum­blest homes of Rus­sia, as well as its churches and pub­lic shrines. Centuries-old artis­tic con­ven­tions are jux­ta­posed with new, West­ern­ized for­mal ele­ments and ver­nac­u­lar inter­pre­ta­tions of these new forms. For Ortho­dox Rus­sians, icons served as more than just reli­gious paint­ings; they were relic-like objects directly linked to the holy fig­ures they depicted.They were seen as com­forters and pow­er­ful guardians.Icons were the direct line from the real world to the spir­i­tual and appeared every­where in pre-Soviet Russia.On loan from Hollingsworth Fine Art.

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* Holy Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­siaHoly Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­sia

Icons from the 17th C. –Early 20th C. The sacred images on view in this exhi­bi­tion are of a kind once read­ily found in even the hum­blest homes of Rus­sia, as well as its churches and pub­lic shrines. Centuries-old artis­tic con­ven­tions are jux­ta­posed with new, West­ern­ized for­mal ele­ments and ver­nac­u­lar inter­pre­ta­tions of these new forms. For Ortho­dox Rus­sians, icons served as more than just reli­gious paint­ings; they were relic-like objects directly linked to the holy fig­ures they depicted.They were seen as com­forters and pow­er­ful guardians.Icons were the direct line from the real world to the spir­i­tual and appeared every­where in pre-Soviet Russia.On loan from Hollingsworth Fine Art.

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* Holy Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­siaHoly Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­sia

Icons from the 17th C. –Early 20th C. The sacred images on view in this exhi­bi­tion are of a kind once read­ily found in even the hum­blest homes of Rus­sia, as well as its churches and pub­lic shrines. Centuries-old artis­tic con­ven­tions are jux­ta­posed with new, West­ern­ized for­mal ele­ments and ver­nac­u­lar inter­pre­ta­tions of these new forms. For Ortho­dox Rus­sians, icons served as more than just reli­gious paint­ings; they were relic-like objects directly linked to the holy fig­ures they depicted.They were seen as com­forters and pow­er­ful guardians.Icons were the direct line from the real world to the spir­i­tual and appeared every­where in pre-Soviet Russia.On loan from Hollingsworth Fine Art.

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* Holy Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­siaHoly Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­sia

Icons from the 17th C. –Early 20th C. The sacred images on view in this exhi­bi­tion are of a kind once read­ily found in even the hum­blest homes of Rus­sia, as well as its churches and pub­lic shrines. Centuries-old artis­tic con­ven­tions are jux­ta­posed with new, West­ern­ized for­mal ele­ments and ver­nac­u­lar inter­pre­ta­tions of these new forms. For Ortho­dox Rus­sians, icons served as more than just reli­gious paint­ings; they were relic-like objects directly linked to the holy fig­ures they depicted.They were seen as com­forters and pow­er­ful guardians.Icons were the direct line from the real world to the spir­i­tual and appeared every­where in pre-Soviet Russia.On loan from Hollingsworth Fine Art.

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* Holy Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­siaHoly Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­sia

Icons from the 17th C. –Early 20th C. The sacred images on view in this exhi­bi­tion are of a kind once read­ily found in even the hum­blest homes of Rus­sia, as well as its churches and pub­lic shrines. Centuries-old artis­tic con­ven­tions are jux­ta­posed with new, West­ern­ized for­mal ele­ments and ver­nac­u­lar inter­pre­ta­tions of these new forms. For Ortho­dox Rus­sians, icons served as more than just reli­gious paint­ings; they were relic-like objects directly linked to the holy fig­ures they depicted.They were seen as com­forters and pow­er­ful guardians.Icons were the direct line from the real world to the spir­i­tual and appeared every­where in pre-Soviet Russia.On loan from Hollingsworth Fine Art.

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* Holy Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­siaHoly Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­sia

Icons from the 17th C. –Early 20th C. The sacred images on view in this exhi­bi­tion are of a kind once read­ily found in even the hum­blest homes of Rus­sia, as well as its churches and pub­lic shrines. Centuries-old artis­tic con­ven­tions are jux­ta­posed with new, West­ern­ized for­mal ele­ments and ver­nac­u­lar inter­pre­ta­tions of these new forms. For Ortho­dox Rus­sians, icons served as more than just reli­gious paint­ings; they were relic-like objects directly linked to the holy fig­ures they depicted.They were seen as com­forters and pow­er­ful guardians.Icons were the direct line from the real world to the spir­i­tual and appeared every­where in pre-Soviet Russia.On loan from Hollingsworth Fine Art.

         
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